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Experiences of Social Harm and Changes in Sexual Practices among Volunteers Who Had Completed a Phase I/II HIV Vaccine Trial Employing HIV-1 DNA Priming and HIV-1 MVA Boosting in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania

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dc.contributor.author Tarimo, Edith A. M.
dc.contributor.author Munseri, Patricia
dc.contributor.author Sandstrom, Eric
dc.contributor.author Mhalu, Fred
dc.contributor.author Aboud, Said
dc.contributor.author Bakari, Muhammad
dc.date.accessioned 2018-02-22T12:21:36Z
dc.date.available 2018-02-22T12:21:36Z
dc.date.issued 2014
dc.identifier.citation Tarimo, E. A., Munseri, P., Aboud, S., Bakari, M., Mhalu, F., & Sandstrom, E. (2014). Experiences of Social Harm and Changes in Sexual Practices among Volunteers Who Had Completed a Phase I/II HIV Vaccine Trial Employing HIV-1 DNA Priming and HIV-1 MVA Boosting in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. PloS one, 9(3), e90938. en_GB
dc.identifier.other doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0090938
dc.identifier.uri http://dpsvr.muhas.ac.tz:8080/xmlui/handle/123456789/2066
dc.description.abstract Background Volunteers in phase I/II HIV vaccine trials are assumed to be at low risk of acquiring HIV infection and are expected to have normal lives in the community. However, during participation in the trials, volunteers may encounter social harm and changes in their sexual behaviours. The current study aimed to study persistence of social harm and changes in sexual practices over time among phase I/II HIV vaccine immunogenicity (HIVIS03) trial volunteers in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Methods and Results A descriptive prospective cohort study was conducted among 33 out of 60 volunteers of HIVIS03 trial in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, who had received three HIV-1 DNA injections boosted with two HIV-1 MVA doses. A structured interview was administered to collect data. Analysis was carried out using SPSS and McNemars’ chi-square (χ2) was used to test the association within-subjects. Participants reported experiencing negative comments from their colleagues about the trial; but such comments were less severe during the second follow up visits (χ2 = 8.72; P<0.001). Most of the comments were associated with discrimination (χ2 = 26.72; P<0.001), stigma (χ2 = 6.06; P<0.05), and mistrust towards the HIV vaccine trial (χ2 = 4.9; P<0.05). Having a regular sexual partner other than spouse or cohabitant declined over the two follow-up periods (χ2 = 4.45; P<0.05). Conclusion Participants in the phase I/II HIV vaccine trial were likely to face negative comments from relatives and colleagues after the end of the trial, but those comments decreased over time. In this study, the inherent sexual practice of having extra sexual partners other than spouse declined over time. Therefore, prolonged counselling and support appears important to minimize risky sexual behaviour among volunteers after participation in HIV Vaccine trials. en_GB
dc.language.iso en en_GB
dc.publisher PLoS One en_GB
dc.subject HIV Vaccine en_GB
dc.subject DNA en_GB
dc.subject Tanzania en_GB
dc.subject HIV-1 MVA en_GB
dc.title Experiences of Social Harm and Changes in Sexual Practices among Volunteers Who Had Completed a Phase I/II HIV Vaccine Trial Employing HIV-1 DNA Priming and HIV-1 MVA Boosting in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania en_GB
dc.type Article en_GB


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